New Catechesis Resources!!

Pilgrims of Christ now provides free public domain copies of the Baltimore Catechism No. 1, the Confessions of St. Augustine Trans. EB Pusey, and Summa Theologica: Part 1.

It’s the fraternity’s hope with time to provide a more detailed break down of each particular texts for reference to specific chapters and parts. Of course, until that time, the text is easily referenced using your “find” feature on your computer.

For further edification, please feel free to read my post On the Influence of St. Augustine and check out my videos where I give small lectures on main topics found in each lesson in the Baltimore Catechism.

God Bless!

Video: Catechism Lesson 4: Creation and the Angels

Greetings,

I am planning to record the next video via using some different equipment, so there may or may not be a video next week on the fall of man.

In this video, I go over the lesson on the creation of all things by God and the creation of the angels. I also go into depth about the history of Angels that is explained in more detail in my book The Birth of God in History. Many scholars point to angels being a development within Judaism either during or after the Babylonian exile. So, in the video, I discuss what exactly Christians should think about such a proposition.

AMDG

The Pilgrim’s Rule (Proposed)

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The Pilgrim’s Rule

 

  1. From the rule of St. Augustine, it is said: Before all else, beloved, love God and then your neighbor, for these are the chief commandments given to us. (cf. Matthew 22:36-40; Mark 12:28-34) The Pilgrim will observe it.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will commit to observing the obligation of Holy Mass weekly and all Holy Days of Obligation.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will observe a regimen of prayer. In our present age, an age where culture at large has been separated from the life of the Church, a Pilgrim should seek to offer daily prayers to God and actively live the liturgical seasons observing the penances and feasts of the Church. A regimen of prayer should be built from a small seed and continued to be watered over time, as St. Teresa of Avila explains in her autobiography. The Pilgrim should strive to build a daily Holy Hour of prayer. The common means for prayer: Daily Mass, Divine Office, Lectio Divina, Rosary, Arrow Prayers, Hymns, Christian meditation, Christian contemplation, and others. It is encouraged for the Pilgrim to incorporate the Divine Office into their daily practice of prayer.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will devote himself to the study of Sacred Scripture. A Pilgrim can partake in such a study by incorporating the daily lectionary readings into their prayer life. One can also use various reading plans by various Catholic publishing houses like Ascension Press and Ignatius Press.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will seek to build up the Domestic Church by teaching all those in their family the faith. It is encouraged that the Pilgrim become familiar with the Catechism of the Catholic Church or various other Catechisms. It shall be observed that it is the duty of the parent to teach the faith to their children. The Church and its Catechists will supplement these principal teachings from the parents in accord to the Catechism of the Catholic Church CCC 1653, 1654, 1655.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will commit to observing all fasting and abstinence observed by the Church. The Pilgrim is encouraged to take on more fasting and abstinence. For example, The Ember Days, Wednesday penance, or others. It is encouraged to take on the traditional means of fasting from food. A Pilgrim can supplement this discipline with fasting from entertainment (internet, television, sports, non-essential purchases, warm showers, etc.)

 

  1. The Pilgrim is encouraged to celebrate the many feasts of the Church. These feasts include, but are not limited to the Patron Saints of this ministry: Pope St. John Paul II (October 22nd) St. Mother Teresa of Calcutta (September 5th). Days that should be celebrations in the life of the Pilgrim: The Baptismal date of each Pilgrim, the feast day of the namesake of their Confirmation, the feast of their patron of the Parish, the feast day of the patron of their local diocese, and any feasts of Particular interests, and others.

 

  1. The Pilgrim will commit to tithing to their local Church, Diocese, and to give alms to Charity. It is encouraged to use the 10% model (8% to the local parish, 1% Diocese, 1% to Charity) or what is recommended by the local Bishop. These offerings will build up both the Church’s mission in the community, as well as aid those who are in need in the community.

 

  1. The Pilgrim should be proactive with their mission of evangelization and charity. The act of charity depends on an act of the will, so do not be afraid to ask others in leadership roles how one can assist the community. A Pilgrim shall offer or provide help when the Holy Spirit compels one to act.

 

  1. Fidelity to the Pope and the local Bishop. Prayer for both their health and most holy intentions

Pilgrims of Christ (Re)launch

Dear Readers,

You may have noticed that Communio disappeared, or maybe not, but I have been working to update posts on my personal blog in hopes of localizing it for parish level outreach. I am currently doing Exodus 90, and since I am setting up this site for both catechesis and works of mercy, I have deemed it necessary usage of the internet in this regard for this particular post.  The website has been rebranded with the name of my Exodus 90 Fraternity name “Pilgrims of Christ.” I’ve always been attracted to the idea of every person being a pilgrim aiding others along the pilgrimage of our earthly lives toward the Kingdom of God.

Some items of note, my book The Birth of God in History: An Examination of the Infancy Narratives of Jesus Christ has been made available for free via PDF under the Christ’s Nativity tab. My parish discussion notes on the Theology of St. Augustine have also been made available in a PDF format under the Augustine tab. I will also make available my short edited PDF guide for Confirmation too.

In the coming months, I hope to write a rule for life for the laity based on the charisms of orthodoxy and charity, the rule of St. Benedict, and St. Augustine. I also hope to complete a small devotional book on the Rosary that I have been writing during the Exodus 90 experience with a tentative date on release for Ascension (it may get pushed back). I also hope to start making small catechesis videos following the Baltimore Catechism in lieu of the Pandemic and the closing parish children catechesis programs.  And if all of this starts to fall in place I hope to create a patreon page for those to support Pilgrims of Christ with giving small gifts: Rosary Book, rosaries, and T-Shirts.

God Bless.

The Birth of God in Historical Context

Dear Readers,

I mentioned earlier this year that I hoped to publish this book by year’s end. The book is a compilation of my earlier work in history as an undergraduate student, posts and debates that had been published on this blog and material written from my most recent Master’s class in theology on the Synoptic Gospels.

The book looks for a historical foundation within the gospel texts under a proper understanding of historicism. An understanding of the influence of both era and culture of the authors in their proper contexts. It expresses agreement with Pope Benedict XVI that the writers do not give a video camera recording of the Gospels, but rather gives a substance of the historical truth–no different from modern testimony. The book sets out to explain why there is good evidence to believe that the Christmas date is of Christian origin and not of pagan origin. It explains via Thomas Aquinas why Jesus had to be born in Bethlehem and what Bethlehem was like when Jesus was born. In the book, I examine the veracity of the census found in Luke’s gospel account. The book also examines the traditions of Mary–the Mother of God, Old Testament typology and prophecy, different historical figures found in the infancy narratives. Finally, the book concludes with a chapter on what is the importance of the genealogies found in the texts of the gospels and the Incarnation of Christ.

Excerpt:

The conception of this book began a few years back, originating from a course I took in college called “The History of Christmas”. The course introduced me to many of the written sources presented in this book as well as fostering a great interest in the infancy narratives of Jesus Christ. After some years, I decided to present some of the material in a discussion group at my local parish to discuss some of the historic legitimacy of infancy narratives found in the Gospels. The book’s text expands on my notes and outlines from this discussion group.

My goal for this book is to distill the many arguments about and ideas on the infancy narratives into one, easily accessible analysis, as well as to shape the dense academic historiography and theological typology into something more palatable for lay readers. Naturally, in this project, some generalizations are needed to summarize the extensive academic scholarship on the subject, so I fully encourage readers to look beyond this book and to explore all sources that I’ve presented here.

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-birth-of-god-in-history-phillip-hadden/1134980944;jsessionid=93B1BDFE33FD0730049AD04C9BE50EB0.prodny_store02-atgap10?ean=9781078744492

 

Farewell to the Devil?

In his essay “Farewell to the Devil?”, Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI) examines and rebuts the argument presented by Swiss Catholic Theologian Herbert Haag, who asserts that Satan does not exist and that Satan was an idea that manifested ancient Jewish culture’s understanding of evil and sin. (Ratzinger, Farewell to the Devil? 197.) Haag’s thesis was written during the time of great cultural upheaval both in secular culture and in Catholic Culture as his book “Farewell to the Devil” would be printed after the Vatican II council. It should be no surprise that Superior General of the Jesuits, Fr. Sosa, has recently made comments that Satan is an analogy making very similar points as presented in Haag’s argument ( A comment that Fr. Sosa has since walked back a bit).

Ratzinger explains that this position is one that uses a methodology that is devoid of literary analysis of scripture but rather is a methodology that focuses on a false historicism (emphasis mine) that those of a different era are either stupid, naive, or both, so in effect, Haag’s position is based on the rhetoric fallacy of “poisoning the well” of the witness testimony of Jesus and the Apostles as it is presented in the New Testament. Haag’s thesis is refuted by Ratzinger by examining the New Testament in which Satan and Demons exist, and the Devil is not a synonym for sin which is claimed by Haag (Ratzinger, Ibid.).

It’s so glaringly obvious in the belief of those in scripture that both Satan and Demons exist that Haag had to admit this is a commonly held belief of those in 1st century Palestine. However, Haag argues that these people were victims of their understanding and culture during this period of time. Again, it’s important to reiterate that Haag’s position is based on his own cultural bias in which he has already assumed those in Jesus’ time are inferior to his own understanding. Naturally, this type of assertion is one of the most dangerous facets of a strict historical-critic exegesis and the use of historicism by modern scholars. Ratzinger does a good job acknowledging that it’s Haag’s bias that has predetermined his conclusion on this matter, Ratzinger writes, “Haag bids the devil farewell, not in his capacity as exegete or interpreter of Scripture, but rather as a contemporary, who considered the existence of a devil untenable (Ratzinger, 198).”

One of the key aspects in understanding Satan and Demons, after examining the role of the Old Testament as being dependent on the New Testament, is understood when Ratzinger writes, “The spiritual battle against the enslaving powers, the exorcism pronounced over a world blinded by demons, is an inseparable part of Jesus’ spiritual way that belongs to the heart of his own mission and of the mission of his disciples.” (Ratzinger, 202). Furthermore, Ratzinger indicates that our understanding of the faith must be rendered within the faith community. If it is to be determined that Satan is merely an analogy to sin or a sort of moral taboo then the Church’s sacramental life with the foundation of baptism would be moot. Ratzinger writes, “One must be able to take baptism at its word, especially in its central action. It indicates what takes place in becoming a Christian and what does not…exorcism and the renunciation of Satan are part of the central action of baptism.” (Ratzinger, 203.)

At the end of the essay, Ratzinger questions what Haag means that the Devil cannot be understood to exist by what we know in our modern age. In many respects, I believe the question of “Farewell to the Devil?” is one that originates in the metaphysical and spiritual and moves into the material, perhaps, there is to be understood better the sacred and the profane. A good measurement of whether something is contingent on faith testimony which is the essence of the faith is its relation to the Incarnation itself.

How does Satan, the demonic, and hell relate to the Incarnation? In the course of the history of the Church, the great heresies have always been misguided teachings on who is Jesus Christ. Satan and hell must be articles of faith as without those parts of revelation, it would render the Incarnation useless. If theologians eliminate Adam and Eve, the fall, hell, and then the slope—as we see today—leads to there being no such thing as sin, then those theologians have rendered Jesus Christ merely an ancient understanding of the world.

Moonlight’s Grace

A  series of Haiku inspired by Chopin’s Nocturne No. 19

Soft clouds in moonlight

Precision grace strikes my heart

A twill spins twilight

Iv’ry sounds belt sky

A soul lifted up Divine

clouds cover moonlight

Truth known by beauty

Expressed; heard; attained—now gone.

Drowned by modern noise